Weird Wednesday: Spectator Sports

From early on in history there have been spectator sports. Although are not all sports meant to be viewed by spectators? Why else would you go and chase a ball around on a field?

Watching sports is a personal choice. Some may see it as a waste of time (five hours times four days = I didn’t get anything done because of The Open golf championship), While others see it as a way to connect with co-workers (“That player was pretty good in that game, huh?).

I like some sports, but others—not so much. When the sport world ground to a halt because of that thing that should not be spoken, I watched a few of the re-runs, but eventually I got of the couch and went out for a run.

Since the Olympics will be starting soon (good idea or bad?), here are a few thoughts in no particular order or preference (I’ll make fun of my sports too):

  • Cycle racing (The Tour de France just wrapped up on the weekend): I’ll stand here for ½ and hour to see my favorite rider—Wait, they are all bunched up and look the same.
  • Nascar: Around and around and around…YAY! A crash! (that’s what you are waiting for, right?)
  • Soccer/Football: What an exciting game! What was the score? One Nil.
  • Marathons: Do I want to see them having fun (Mile 3) or not (Mile 25)
  • Hockey: There is an old joke, “I went to a fight and a hockey game broke out.”
  • American football vs. Rugby: Too much protection vs. Not enough?
  • Equestrian: I’ve always thought that the horse should get the medal.
  • Bowling: Amateur – Strike, spare, spare, strike, spare. Professional – Strike, strike, strike, strike, strike…
  • Basketball: Maybe they should have 4-pointers.

Finally, in the “Wait! What?” category:

  • The National Cornhole Association: Yeah. There is a sport called Cornhole.

Onto this week’s cartoons:

“The Miniscules”

“The Untitled”

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That’s all the weirdness for today.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

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Weird Wednesday: July 14 – Food for Thought

I like food. A lot. I exercise regularly and have a high metabolism. There is not much that I don’t like or won’t try. However:

I like cooked broccoli, but I’m not a fan of it in raw form—even smothered in dip or hummus. Yet, I’ll chow down on raw cauliflower while begrudgingly eat it cooked—even drizzled with cheese sauce.

I’ll eat a pear, but I prefer not to.

A few idiosyncrasies:

I can eat an entire head of romaine lettuce in a Caesar salad, and if by chance I don’t finish it, I do enjoy it the next day, soggy croutons and all.

Odd sandwich choice: Peanut butter and cheese.

Dessert? Often a bowl of cereal.

And one final thought: Ripple Chips are a flavor.

Cartoons

The Untitled

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That’s all the weirdness for today.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Newest design! “Peloton”

Weird Wednesday: July 7 New Followers

If I read my schedule correctly, my author showcase with Itsy Bitsy Book Bits Promotions is entering its 5th day and my website will be highlighted. Along with all the readers there – and my new followers here, I’d like to welcome you the my Wednesday blog I like to call, Weird Wedne—

Oh, you probably read the title, didn’t you. Many days have themes: Music Monday, Tuesday Tirade, Thursday Thoughts, Free Book Friday (very popular), Week-end Wrap-up, and Second Chance Sunday.

On Wednesday, I’ll usually write a humorous piece or commentary, and post my two cartoons: The Miniscules and The Untitled.

Now that I have set myself up to have to write something humorous…or post something humorous

One of the weirdest things I have come up with since I started writing is a series of interviews I did with myself. I still smile when I read them, so I think it’s worth posting. I hope you will too. I’ll wait till you get back.

Leon Stevens Interviews Himself

Welcome back! On to the cartoons:

Cartoons

The Untitled

You can see them all here: https://linesbyleon.com/some-of-my-favorite-writings/

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The Miniscules

Far too many for one gallery, but you can read about them here: https://linesbyleon.com/2020/11/23/miniscule-mondays/

That’s all the weirdness for today.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Newest design! “Peloton”

Tuesday Tidbits: It’s a Small World

When I first went to Disneyworld (or is it Disneyland? I can never remember which one is which), anyway, the one in Florida, I went with a college buddy and his parents in an RV. Now I know what you are thinking—that sounds like a fun time, but hey, it didn’t cost me anything for travel/lodging, and I wasn’t old enough to buy booze (he was though😊). Did I mention it happened to be Spring Break?

It was the first time out of the country for me, young adult, with people of no relation to me, no passports required. Wow. Times change.

Disneyworld at the time was just doing its first major expansion. The only attractions available were the Magic Kingdom and Epcot Center. A few highlights were: Seeing the Space Shuttle take off as we ate breakfast, going on my first rollercoaster, hitting the German pavilion and drinking beer, then as a joke we went on the “It’s a Small World” ride. That’s an earworm you won’t get rid of quickly.

We convinced (begged) his parents to go to Daytona Beach. We had one day to get Spring Break out of our system. I don’t remember much—not from drinking, but because it’s a long time ago. Anyway…

Fast-forward to today—and the crux of today’s post:

Land travel hasn’t changed much over that last 50 years, but the time it takes us to fly somewhere sure has, although the delays at the airport security and customs usually negates those gains. Soon, we will have sub-orbital fights that will whisk travelers from one side of the world to the other (talk about jet lag).

We have instantaneous (almost) communication with anywhere on the globe. News travels fast, bad news travels faster. Although, I do find it odd when local news anchors talk to local reporters and there is a 3-4 second delay.

Like it or not, the world is almost completely connected. No greater example was the pandemic which spread throughout the entire globe within months. One the plus side, the reverse is true with vaccine flowing, just not as fast.

Viruses don’t have to deal with bureaucracy.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Weird Wednesday: June 30

Languages are weird. I’m not a linguistics expert, I’m not even an expert in the English language.

 Every so often, I come across a word that makes me think: Why is it like that? For example: CON – tent vs. con-TENT – Same word, two different meanings. Talk about lazy.

Here are some other thoughts:

  • Why do we have double consonants? Double vowels I get—kinda
  • About vowels, Yes, there are long and short, so why didn’t we just put the dash or curve above to denote the quality?
  • Silent letters. What are they hiding? A nif?
  • Homophones like hair/hare, deer/dear, heir/air, bear/bare…Vocabulary increases over time. I’m sure our English-speaking ancestors had more than enough words to go around.
  • Why not spell phonically? Iz that so tuf?
  • How did “io” come to represent “sh”?

Cartoons

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The Miniscules

That’s all the weirdness for today.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

15% off all my mugs in my Zazzle store until 6/19!

Newest design! “Peloton”

Tuesday Tidbits: “I’ll take Quotable Quotes for 500 Alex.”

Do you like quotes? I’m not talking about the punctuation marks— although they are adorable—or the sarcastic remarks we make out loud accompanied by air bunnies, but the little soundbites usually taken out of context to inspire, motivate, or confound. Many “quotes” (see what I did there?) get changed because, like a game of Telephone, the words get misheard.

Quotes make great posters—especially if there is a kitten on it—or coffee mugs. One second…scratch that. Let’s start again: Quotes look good on posters and on coffee mugs (that’s better).

Type in “famous quotes” into your favorite search engine (I can guess what it is with 90% certainty) and you will find many sites to choose from. Most quotes do come from famous people only because their words are most often recorded.

Now some quotes may seem quite insightful on first reading, but upon closer inspection, really don’t make sense. Quotes can make you seem smart for a few moments: “I am so smart. SMRT.” Quotes can remove all responsibility—“Don’t quote me on this, but…”. Some people have quotes that they like to live by. Whenever someone asks me what my favorite quote is, I tell them this:

Commitment is doing what you said you would do, long after the mood you said it in has gone.”*

I wouldn’t consider it a tenet I live by because most of the time I forget about it, but I think it makes a great serving suggestion.

Sometimes, I think that I have written an original quote only to find out it is not. I will end off today with a quote that I know I wrote (you may have seen it at the bottom of my website):

“You may think that I am bitter, but I’m not. I’m tangy” – Leon Stevens

Do you have a favorite quote?

-Leon

*Five points if you can credit this quote.


Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Thursday Thoughts: Coincidence

Sometimes, if I wake up in the middle of the night, I can guess the time and be close with many of those. This morning for example, when I awoke, I thought it might be 4:20 (oh, I went back to sleep, no worries) and when I looked at my bedside clock it read 4:19. Wow.

Do you ever think of a song and then immediately hear it? What about thinking that person that you haven’t seen or heard of for a while and then you bump into them on the street?

Weird when that happens, right?

Last Thursday, I wrote about the computer keyboard:

The keyboard configuration that is most common is the QWERTY keyboard, but there are different ones out there based on the frequency of keystrokes. I don’t think the QWERTY is the most efficient, but I don’t know which one is—I’m sure it would be hard to get all businesses and industries on board to change it, just like ignoring the metric system (Yeah, I’m talking to you, USA).

A few days later, I was reading a book which mentioned the invention of the typewriter. The reason for the conventional configuration was to slow down the rate of typing because the strikers would jam if adjacent keys were pressed too quickly in succession. The most common letters were spread out to achieve this.

There are keyboard configurations that concentrate most frequent letters under the fingers, that reduce effort by 95% and increase speed by 50% but this was done well after the QWERTY set-up was entrenched in the world.

I’m sure there are odds for coincidences like these to happen. Maybe I should go buy that lottery ticket…

-Leon


Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Weird Wednesday: June 23 – The Mask

Things are returning to “normal” in some parts of the world as some countries drop health restrictions as they re-open. It is interesting to see crowds of people attending events like concerts, sports, or just eating out.

What I find odd is that seeing a masked person in a crowd now is equivalent to seeing a maskless person before. You still get the impression that the people around are thinking “What’s wrong with you?” for different reasons.

I think in many countries, the vaccination rate is ~70% first dose / 40% second dose. I still think that with those numbers, having 20000 people in close quarters is a bit premature.

To enjoy the summer we missed last year, we should still respect physical distancing with strangers while we slowly expand our social bubble as friends/family get vaccinated.

This is no over yet. It’s getting there, though.

Cartoons

Yesterday, I wrote about a few of the comics that I enjoy. Here I enjoy sharing my sense (or lack of) humor.

The Miniscules

That’s all the weirdness for today.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

15% off all my mugs in my Zazzle store until 6/19!

Newest design! “Peloton”

Tuesday Tidbits: Childhood Everlasting

by Waterson

I started re-reading my Calvin and Hobbes books. If you have never heard of them, it is a comic strip created by Bill Waterson about a young boy and his stuffed tiger. There is no doubt in Calvin’s mind that Hobbes is real. As a reader, there is no doubt either.

Along with the shenanigans (i.e. trouble) they get into, there are deep philosophical conversations that you would not expect from a young child, much less a tiger. Calvin’s imagination paired with Hobbes’ practicality if the perfect balance between impulse and restraint—well maybe not perfect, as impulse wins out quite often.

It’s funny that a comic strip can go on for years, the characters never aging, and we don’t give it a second thought. Like The Simpsons, who’s children are still in elementary school after 30+ years. Not to mention Kerney, who has been there even longer. I suppose it’s like when we were young, growing up seemed so very far away.

I don’t read cartoons or cartoon strips very often anymore, but cartoons like The Far Side, Bloom County, and Calvin and Hobbes bring back memories of sitting with my sister, laughing so hard there were tears.

Thank you, Bill, Gary, and Berkeley.

Do you have any favorites?

-Leon


Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!

Monday Musings – Golf. Not as boring as Baseball?

Did you watch the US Open yesterday? Golf is an odd sport to watch. For the most part, it’s the same thing with different players, as the coverage switches from group to group until near the end of the tournament, there are less and less players on the course, so there are more and more commercials.

In other sports, when the opposing team comes onto the field/pitch/ice, the home crowd will boo and jeer their disdain for the players. In golf, it seems that everyone roots for whoever makes a good shot, lets out a disappointing “ohhh” when the ball ends up in a bunker/water hazard/ penalty area, and cheers in delight for the winner.

There are sports teams and players that people love to hate, but it is rare that a fan will publicly razz a golfer during a tournament. I suppose that the politeness and etiquette of the game contribute to the spectator’s behavior.

That being said, there are places where the crowd is more raucous. The mobbing of Phil Mickelson on 18 at the PGA Championship earlier this year is a good example. The stadium hole at the WM Pheonix Open (I believe it is the par 3 16th), where 20 000 fans will boo if the player fails to hit the green, is entertaining—and obviously sells more beer. What does WM stand for? Waste Management. Ha! During this Sunday’s round, a fan ran onto the 13th fairway and proceeded to hit a few balls. The empty case of beer beside the cart path probably explains that.

The first person to yell “IN THE HOLE!” after a tee shot started an annoying trend that isn’t funny anymore—especially on a par 5. If you mistime it, it really makes the player angry. The first time I heard someone yell “Dy-No-Mite!” when the golfer (not the comedian) Jimmy Walker teed off, I had to laugh, but thankfully that never caught on.

I assume that the PGA, like all sports, is trying to attract younger fans. But if you think that it does sometimes look like a scene from Happy Gilmore, you wouldn’t be far off (It is a pretty funny movie unless you don’t like Adam Sandler, but if you only have to watch one of his movies, this one is a good choice—or The Wedding Singer). Tin Cup is another golf movie that shows the less reserved side of the game.

While they may not be as entertaining from a sociological standpoint, there are tournaments that are more reserved than others. So, a few more weeks until The Open Championship and a return to a bit more civility.  

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!