Monday Musings: Out of Touch

No cell service, no Wifi.

In the middle of nowhere? Not exactly. Just an hour and a half drive from where I usually wake up.

I stand on the rocky shore of the unusually calm lake. The rounded rocks slip under my feet and a few steps into the water they become slippery. The water is not very cold, probably because we have had such a hot summer. I crouch down and push myself out over the glassy surface.

The next morning, coffee in hand, I once again make my way to the lakeshore. The smoke in the air gives the rising sun a sinister blush, but also gives it a crisp outline as it begins its day’s journey. It’s captivating, and I take quick side glances at it. The reflection seems to swim toward me the longer I remain.

The island on the horizon is barely visible, and it seems to float above the once again calm waters. Birds flit through the trees, and ducks, annoyed by my presence let me know in language I suspect to be…well not so nice.

That afternoon, after 10 long hours of labor on the cabin (not mine), it’s time to pack it in. The rain came down in a torrent for five minutes earlier—it’s the first rain I’ve seen in a month (that would explain the low water level on the lake)—and it was over so quickly that I missed standing in it.

The wind has returned the water to its normal angry self, but not belligerent enough to prevent another foray to clean the day’s sweat from my body. I would like to stay here longer, but it’s time to pack up.

Leaving the lake behind, the gravel road gradually widens until it reaches the highway. Five minutes later my cellphone pings, alerting me to the presence of connectivity. I look for missed messages. No texts, no calls. Nice. Everyone I care about already knew where I was.

Now to tackle my email in box.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

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Tuesday Tidbits: It’s a Small World

When I first went to Disneyworld (or is it Disneyland? I can never remember which one is which), anyway, the one in Florida, I went with a college buddy and his parents in an RV. Now I know what you are thinking—that sounds like a fun time, but hey, it didn’t cost me anything for travel/lodging, and I wasn’t old enough to buy booze (he was though😊). Did I mention it happened to be Spring Break?

It was the first time out of the country for me, young adult, with people of no relation to me, no passports required. Wow. Times change.

Disneyworld at the time was just doing its first major expansion. The only attractions available were the Magic Kingdom and Epcot Center. A few highlights were: Seeing the Space Shuttle take off as we ate breakfast, going on my first rollercoaster, hitting the German pavilion and drinking beer, then as a joke we went on the “It’s a Small World” ride. That’s an earworm you won’t get rid of quickly.

We convinced (begged) his parents to go to Daytona Beach. We had one day to get Spring Break out of our system. I don’t remember much—not from drinking, but because it’s a long time ago. Anyway…

Fast-forward to today—and the crux of today’s post:

Land travel hasn’t changed much over that last 50 years, but the time it takes us to fly somewhere sure has, although the delays at the airport security and customs usually negates those gains. Soon, we will have sub-orbital fights that will whisk travelers from one side of the world to the other (talk about jet lag).

We have instantaneous (almost) communication with anywhere on the globe. News travels fast, bad news travels faster. Although, I do find it odd when local news anchors talk to local reporters and there is a 3-4 second delay.

Like it or not, the world is almost completely connected. No greater example was the pandemic which spread throughout the entire globe within months. One the plus side, the reverse is true with vaccine flowing, just not as fast.

Viruses don’t have to deal with bureaucracy.

-Leon

Leon Stevens is a blogger, composer, artist, and an author of three books (so far): Lines by Leon: Poems, Prose, and PicturesJourneys: Eight Original Pieces for Classical Guitar and The Knot at the End of the Rope and Other Short Stories.
www.linesbyleon.com

Purchase paperback directly for the author!